Naitisarvi Kalppinokka

A female from northern Finland.

General trigger warning: lots of ranting about rape and violence.

“My family used to joke that only white people need therapy. Black people go to church instead, find remedies on their knees in prayer, sing their sorrows away. Meanwhile, white academics told me that African-Americans merely fabricated ungrounded stigma around psychiatric help. As absurd as these two viewpoints may sound, these myths actually point to a greater phenomenon.

As of 2012, 15% of the US American population without health insurance was African-American. Considering the role economic status plays in healthcare sheds light on the racial discrepancy with respect to treating mental illness. Many people with health insurance find that their companies don’t cover the cost of mental illness treatment, and those without any health insurance find themselves facing incredibly high prices to pay for medical care, or opting not to pursue treatment at all. These obstacles often lead Black folks in the states to “rely on family, religious and social communities for emotional support rather than turning to health care professionals, even though this may at times be necessary,” states NAMI’s fact sheet on African American Community Mental Health.

Even if able to pay for treatment, many Black folks encounter prejudices and biases from medical caregivers. Black people, especially Black men, are frequently misdiagnosed when it comes to mental illness. For example, most prominently in the 1960s, white doctors institutionalized Black men involved in civil rights protests (particularly in Detroit) on the grounds that the behaviors these men defended as political activism was really schizophrenic rage and volatility. Also, medical practitioners’ prescriptions sometimes reflect discriminatory and generally racial assumptions that Black people do not need as much medicine as white people. Studies conducted by the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health discovered that Black US Americans are 1.5 times as likely to be denied antidepressant treatment. No one wants tell you that the system is sick. No one wants to tell you that the healthcare system intentionally keeps historically marginalized groups like queer folks, and Black folks, and people who happen to find themselves at the intersection of queerness and Blackness sick.”

—   

To Be Queer, Black, and “Sick” | Autostraddle (via brutereason)

This is not a feel good article, but it NEEDS to be said. This is a huge problem, and part of the reason that I will never shame anyone for having self-diagnosed.

(via depressionresource)

(via moniquill)

dampsandwich:

katzmatt:

seeyainanotherlife:

cassandrugs:

tseecka:

samandriel:

dajo42:

“Can I touch your butt” in Elvish.

This is so useful

No, this is not “Can I touch your butt” in Elvish. This is “Can I touch your butt?” in English, transcribed using the letters of the Elvish alphabet. There is a difference. 
In Elvish, the letters of the alphabet correspond to sounds, not to words. The above text spells it out using one symbol to represent one letter of the original English, which is incorrect:
c-a-n  i  t-o-u-c-h  y-o-u-r  b-u-t-t
If you really want to spell out an English phrase using the Elvish alphabet, you would do so phonetically, which would basically equate to one symbol per phoneme (sound):
c-a-n  a-i  t-u-ch  y-o-r  b-u-t
If you actually wanted to write “Can I touch your butt?” in Elvish, one (very rough) translation would be:

Annog nin daf pladan tele ci?

Which, in Sindarin Elvish, roughly translates to, “Would you give me permission to touch your rear?”
Written in tengwar (the Elvish alphabet), it would look like this:

Sorry for the blurry quality.

damn, the lotr fandom doesnt fuck around

wow

not to mention LOOK HOW POLITE THIS WAS 
LIKE GOOD LORD 
OLDEST FANDOMS REALLY ARE POLITEST 

fuckin nerds

dampsandwich:

katzmatt:

seeyainanotherlife:

cassandrugs:

tseecka:

samandriel:

dajo42:

“Can I touch your butt” in Elvish.

This is so useful

No, this is not “Can I touch your butt” in Elvish. This is “Can I touch your butt?” in English, transcribed using the letters of the Elvish alphabet. There is a difference. 

In Elvish, the letters of the alphabet correspond to sounds, not to words. The above text spells it out using one symbol to represent one letter of the original English, which is incorrect:

  • c-a-n  i  t-o-u-c-h  y-o-u-r  b-u-t-t

If you really want to spell out an English phrase using the Elvish alphabet, you would do so phonetically, which would basically equate to one symbol per phoneme (sound):

  • c-a-n  a-i  t-u-ch  y-o-r  b-u-t

If you actually wanted to write “Can I touch your butt?” in Elvish, one (very rough) translation would be:

  • Annog nin daf pladan tele ci?

Which, in Sindarin Elvish, roughly translates to, “Would you give me permission to touch your rear?”

Written in tengwar (the Elvish alphabet), it would look like this:

image

Sorry for the blurry quality.

damn, the lotr fandom doesnt fuck around

wow

not to mention LOOK HOW POLITE THIS WAS 

LIKE GOOD LORD 

OLDEST FANDOMS REALLY ARE POLITEST 

fuckin nerds

(Source: dajo42, via moniquill)

moniquill:

Teens who expect to die young are more likely to commit crime

knitmeapony:

Today from the No Shit Files, aka Sometimes All Science Does Is Make Reality Obvious To The Oblivious.

You find yourself in a group of people standing next to a cliff.

Suddenly, someone pushes another person, sending them over the edge. Thankfully, the victim is able to hold on to the edge rather than fall to their death, but nobody makes a move to help them or stop the perpetrator. Everyone, including yourself, simply stands there watching.

Angry that they’ve been pushed, angry that nobody is helping them as they struggle not to fall, the victim screams, ‘Is anybody going to fucking help me??’

That gets everyone’s attention. ‘Why are you mad at me?’ one person asks. ‘I didn’t push you.’

'Nobody is going to want to help you with an attitude like that.'

'You're just as bad as him.'

Nobody makes a move to help.

The victim screams in frustration, their fingers slipping. ‘You’ve got to be fucking joking!’ they shout as they lose their grip.

'You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.' You say as you walk away.

Welcome to the anti-sj/’real justice’ movement.

—   

(via princenmonster)

some of the anti sj will step on that person’s fingers too because they think they’re being “too harsh”

(via princexneeshydoomcuddles)

(via moniquill)

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

(via moniquill)

thehidingcat:

stupidmiiverseposts:

There has only been five female characters comfirmed playable compared to fifteen male characters.

I’m amazed at those exact numbers because 33% is the point where men will start thinking there’s a majority of women in a group.

(via moniquill)

aiffe:

004mog:

aiffe:

moniquill:

deckthehallswithbooksandmagic:

f1nnicks-trident:

zavocado:

frosty-finnick:

Reblog with the District that you would live in if Panem was real. I wanna see how far this actually goes lol District 2

Someone help, I’m drowning. I’m right on the edge of a nation and I’m drowning

oooh just barely squeezing in 12

8

Question?
WTF happened that caused mountains to become submerged before low-lying areas?
Elevation is a hell of a drug:

That’s a map of North America 115 million years ago.
When the sea levels rise, prairies and great plains go under before mountains do.

wow this kind of poor planning is lowering my hopes for The Hunger Games (yep I still haven’t read it yet, but it’s looking likely that I will soon). Like ok the floodplain thing is really poor planning, but I can sorta see how it could happen, like, a writer not thinking enough about elevation just sitting by a map with a marker. But what’s really irritating me is how closely it also follows POLITICAL boundaries. There’s a flat slice up north. Is that the Great Wall,  is Jon Snow standing on it? Why is all of freakin’ Canada just “wilds”?
I lose respect for science fiction when it can’t deal with The Problem of Canada. Like Fahrenheit 451 is this dystopian future where ALL books are burned in the US. In Canada books are legal. The protagonist goes from being the cop that burns the books (a “fireman”) to realizing books are actually pretty awesome. He joins a roving band of hobos that become a “living library” by completely memorizing books verbatim, then burning them. INSTEAD OF SMUGGLING THEM INTO CANADA. OR IDK, FUCKING LIVING THERE.
It’s like people’s brains shut down when they try to imagine Canada in the future? (Either as future!Canada, or being taken over/merged into some other country, but still as like, a viable place populated with humans, that is possible to go to if one chooses.)
Also she managed to not as completely follow the political border with Mexico, but it’s still like, aside from these couple of feet over here, Mexico no longer exists. -_____- It’s all conveniently underwater. Even those mountains. I’m just kind of, uh. Seriously? Seriously?? You can set futuristic stuff in the US without making it this painfully US-centric. Like stuff can happen in future!US without making it explicitly that the world outside the US FELL OFF THE MAP.


Not sure if anyone has responded to this yet and I know this post is months old, but here goes:
As far as I am aware (since I haven’t checked for about 2 years), this (and any other Hunger Games/Panem maps) is fan-made.  Suzanne Collins never was that specific about her geography.  Without getting up and pulling the books from my shelf, I can say for sure that Panem is somewhere in North America, District 12 is in Appalachia, and The Capitol is near the Rockies.  Googling “Hunger Games map” brings up a slew of different results all based on different readers’ interpretations or imaginations.  (And of all the maps out there, yes, this one is most noteworthy for the convenient “but we still kept the border to Canada” part.)  So yeah, not a Collins thing.  Personally, I imagined District 12 as much smaller than depicted on that map.  Collins described all of that district’s population as being able to fit in the town square, and it only took a morning of travel for everyone to get there IIRC.  I don’t know about the sizes of the other districts.  Katniss herself wondered the logistics of gathering the larger districts’ populations in one area for the reapings, or even if it was done that way at all.  (Again, this is as far as I remember—I last reread the books a couple months ago.)
Now, if we are going to talk about weird geographical stuff that came straight from canon, there’s the idea that each district is….I don’t know, shoehorned into roles that seem grossly oversimplified.  Like, I don’t really know a whole lot about how this stuff works IRL.  But it always seemed…weird to me, that, “Here, here is the district where the ONLY thing they do is cattle!  And here is the district where they just do lumber!  And if you cross this arbitrary borderline, suddenly you are now a farmer!”  To be fair, Katniss’s district (coal mining) was varied enough on the inside—there were teachers, merchants, possibly craftsmen, Peeta’s family owned a bakery, and Katniss’s mom was a healer, in addition to many (probably the majority?) of District 12 citizens being coal miners.  And it’s made pretty clear that the Capitol absolutely does shoehorn the districts into caricatures of their industry, with the way that they dress up the Tributes before each Hunger Games.  But sometimes it felt like Collins was doing it too.  There’s one character introduced in the second book, who at one point we find out she can throw axes really well, and Katniss is all OH OF COURSE SHE’S GREAT WITH THROWING AXES BECAUSE DISTRICT 7 AND THEY DO TREES THERE.  This sort of thing always took me out of the story because I had to stop and roll my eyes…
TLDR: You don’t have to lower your expectations for The Hunger Games trilogy, at least when it comes to inclusion of non-US countries, because Collins was ambiguous about the geography.

It’s good to know that map was fan-made! (whoops I still need to read these tho god I’m so slow)
Regarding the specific areas doing different things, well, this is talking about books I haven’t read, but I think that may fit with the setting? Basically…okay. Henry Ford started the whole assembly line thing—prior to that, you needed skilled labor in manufacturing, someone who knew how to make all or most of the parts and put them together. Ford’s way, you could quickly train a person to do only one thing, and devalue their labor because they were easy to replace. This model has expanded with globalization, where certain things are only done in certain places. I looked into some of this stuff when concerned about companies outsourcing to places with laxer labor laws so they could exploit their workers, and found that certain things, such as many electronic parts, are ONLY made in a few countries, sometimes only in one country. And to some extent this is also happening in other ways, for example agricultural areas that monocrop corn even though that’s terrible for the soil, because in that time and place, corn is what you grow.
In the long run what this does is create dependency. If your area only grows one type of food, you rely on importing for other goods—different kinds of food, textiles, lumber, metals, coal. And as I understand it, in The Hunger Games everything is ruled by an elite upper class that is like a few million times wealthier than anyone on the bottom, with an extreme and unbridgeable class gap (oh wait did I say The Hunger Games I meant real life) which can then sell all those goods to each other at a premium because they can’t produce it themselves.
It’s a common capitalist trick to make people rely on a pay service for something they already had, then remove access to their original resource. This is why when colonizing native peoples, one of the first things the colonizers try to destroy is access to their food supply, so they can sell them food. They may also shame them for their clothes or make wearing traditional clothes illegal, to force them to buy clothes from them too. Not only does this demoralize a population, humiliate them and separate them from their culture, but it forces dependence on their conquerors. There are less extreme, but very common examples, like making baby formula ubiquitous rather than something used when breast milk wasn’t an option, or selling people bottled water (and then fracking to make their previously perfectly fine tapwater now questionable).
So basically what you’re describing in The Hunger Games sounds like an extreme example of commodification, globalization and the assembly line on a large scale, and not at all improbable for how an elite, abusive group would structure society given the power to do so. It’s profitable, it’s easy to control, and it forces dependence.

aiffe:

004mog:

aiffe:

moniquill:

deckthehallswithbooksandmagic:

f1nnicks-trident:

zavocado:

frosty-finnick:

Reblog with the District that you would live in if Panem was real. I wanna see how far this actually goes lol
District 2

Someone help, I’m drowning. I’m right on the edge of a nation and I’m drowning

oooh just barely squeezing in 12

8

Question?

WTF happened that caused mountains to become submerged before low-lying areas?

Elevation is a hell of a drug:

That’s a map of North America 115 million years ago.

When the sea levels rise, prairies and great plains go under before mountains do.

wow this kind of poor planning is lowering my hopes for The Hunger Games (yep I still haven’t read it yet, but it’s looking likely that I will soon). Like ok the floodplain thing is really poor planning, but I can sorta see how it could happen, like, a writer not thinking enough about elevation just sitting by a map with a marker. But what’s really irritating me is how closely it also follows POLITICAL boundaries. There’s a flat slice up north. Is that the Great Wall,  is Jon Snow standing on it? Why is all of freakin’ Canada just “wilds”?

I lose respect for science fiction when it can’t deal with The Problem of Canada. Like Fahrenheit 451 is this dystopian future where ALL books are burned in the US. In Canada books are legal. The protagonist goes from being the cop that burns the books (a “fireman”) to realizing books are actually pretty awesome. He joins a roving band of hobos that become a “living library” by completely memorizing books verbatim, then burning them. INSTEAD OF SMUGGLING THEM INTO CANADA. OR IDK, FUCKING LIVING THERE.

It’s like people’s brains shut down when they try to imagine Canada in the future? (Either as future!Canada, or being taken over/merged into some other country, but still as like, a viable place populated with humans, that is possible to go to if one chooses.)

Also she managed to not as completely follow the political border with Mexico, but it’s still like, aside from these couple of feet over here, Mexico no longer exists. -_____- It’s all conveniently underwater. Even those mountains. I’m just kind of, uh. Seriously? Seriously?? You can set futuristic stuff in the US without making it this painfully US-centric. Like stuff can happen in future!US without making it explicitly that the world outside the US FELL OFF THE MAP.

image

Not sure if anyone has responded to this yet and I know this post is months old, but here goes:

As far as I am aware (since I haven’t checked for about 2 years), this (and any other Hunger Games/Panem maps) is fan-made.  Suzanne Collins never was that specific about her geography.  Without getting up and pulling the books from my shelf, I can say for sure that Panem is somewhere in North America, District 12 is in Appalachia, and The Capitol is near the Rockies.  Googling “Hunger Games map” brings up a slew of different results all based on different readers’ interpretations or imaginations.  (And of all the maps out there, yes, this one is most noteworthy for the convenient “but we still kept the border to Canada” part.)  So yeah, not a Collins thing.  Personally, I imagined District 12 as much smaller than depicted on that map.  Collins described all of that district’s population as being able to fit in the town square, and it only took a morning of travel for everyone to get there IIRC.  I don’t know about the sizes of the other districts.  Katniss herself wondered the logistics of gathering the larger districts’ populations in one area for the reapings, or even if it was done that way at all.  (Again, this is as far as I remember—I last reread the books a couple months ago.)

Now, if we are going to talk about weird geographical stuff that came straight from canon, there’s the idea that each district is….I don’t know, shoehorned into roles that seem grossly oversimplified.  Like, I don’t really know a whole lot about how this stuff works IRL.  But it always seemed…weird to me, that, “Here, here is the district where the ONLY thing they do is cattle!  And here is the district where they just do lumber!  And if you cross this arbitrary borderline, suddenly you are now a farmer!”  To be fair, Katniss’s district (coal mining) was varied enough on the inside—there were teachers, merchants, possibly craftsmen, Peeta’s family owned a bakery, and Katniss’s mom was a healer, in addition to many (probably the majority?) of District 12 citizens being coal miners.  And it’s made pretty clear that the Capitol absolutely does shoehorn the districts into caricatures of their industry, with the way that they dress up the Tributes before each Hunger Games.  But sometimes it felt like Collins was doing it too.  There’s one character introduced in the second book, who at one point we find out she can throw axes really well, and Katniss is all OH OF COURSE SHE’S GREAT WITH THROWING AXES BECAUSE DISTRICT 7 AND THEY DO TREES THERE.  This sort of thing always took me out of the story because I had to stop and roll my eyes…

TLDR: You don’t have to lower your expectations for The Hunger Games trilogy, at least when it comes to inclusion of non-US countries, because Collins was ambiguous about the geography.

It’s good to know that map was fan-made! (whoops I still need to read these tho god I’m so slow)

Regarding the specific areas doing different things, well, this is talking about books I haven’t read, but I think that may fit with the setting? Basically…okay. Henry Ford started the whole assembly line thing—prior to that, you needed skilled labor in manufacturing, someone who knew how to make all or most of the parts and put them together. Ford’s way, you could quickly train a person to do only one thing, and devalue their labor because they were easy to replace. This model has expanded with globalization, where certain things are only done in certain places. I looked into some of this stuff when concerned about companies outsourcing to places with laxer labor laws so they could exploit their workers, and found that certain things, such as many electronic parts, are ONLY made in a few countries, sometimes only in one country. And to some extent this is also happening in other ways, for example agricultural areas that monocrop corn even though that’s terrible for the soil, because in that time and place, corn is what you grow.

In the long run what this does is create dependency. If your area only grows one type of food, you rely on importing for other goods—different kinds of food, textiles, lumber, metals, coal. And as I understand it, in The Hunger Games everything is ruled by an elite upper class that is like a few million times wealthier than anyone on the bottom, with an extreme and unbridgeable class gap (oh wait did I say The Hunger Games I meant real life) which can then sell all those goods to each other at a premium because they can’t produce it themselves.

It’s a common capitalist trick to make people rely on a pay service for something they already had, then remove access to their original resource. This is why when colonizing native peoples, one of the first things the colonizers try to destroy is access to their food supply, so they can sell them food. They may also shame them for their clothes or make wearing traditional clothes illegal, to force them to buy clothes from them too. Not only does this demoralize a population, humiliate them and separate them from their culture, but it forces dependence on their conquerors. There are less extreme, but very common examples, like making baby formula ubiquitous rather than something used when breast milk wasn’t an option, or selling people bottled water (and then fracking to make their previously perfectly fine tapwater now questionable).

So basically what you’re describing in The Hunger Games sounds like an extreme example of commodification, globalization and the assembly line on a large scale, and not at all improbable for how an elite, abusive group would structure society given the power to do so. It’s profitable, it’s easy to control, and it forces dependence.

(Source: hunger-games-victor, via moniquill)

maxxiegalaxy:

marauders4evr:

Friendly reminder that this creepy moment existed. 


#she was laughing at her husband and son#people who she loved dearly enough to give up her life#and snape took that and cut them out of it so he could pretend she was laughing for him#her love in the letter was for sirius who was best man at her wedding and her good friend who fought at her side in the order#and snape took that so he could pretend her love was for him#snape is fucking trash and this is not romantic at all






this this this this this omg this si so disgusting this guy is a creep who feels entitled to Lily’s love even though he’s done nothing to deserve it

soradiesinkh3:

seriousjones:

officers, i’m afraid you can’t arrest me for murder. when i murdered that guy, i was only doing it to highlight how ridiculous and wrong is to murder someone. it was actually quite anti-murder if you think about it. i understand how you might make that mistake, but next time i hope you don’t take my actions out of context :^)

ANTI-SJS BE LIKEEEEEEEEEEE

(via moniquill)

moniquill:

Poor students with degree worse off than rich students without one

theuppitynegras:

blackfemalescientist:

big-gadje-world:

odundun:

LOL WOULDJA LOOK AT THAT? THE BOOTSTRAPS MYTH: GONE WITH THE WIND.

They actually needed a study for this?!

Latest research from the university of obvious put out by the department of “ya don’t say”

breaking news: water is wet

(Source: gingerche)

lyssalovescookies:

flailmorpho:

wastelandbabe:

lowbutt:

MY SCIENCE TEACHER CAUGHT THE TABLE ON FIRE AND HES JUST STARING AT IT

I LOVE SCIENCE TEACHERS

I’M SORRY BUT HOW BADLY DID HE FUCK UP READING HIS CALIPER?


#my environmental science teacher was demonstrating how pumice can float#so she just went around the room dropping them into people’s water bottles#but one of them didn’t float#so then she lit a match and dropped it into the bottle#and it blew up#that’s how we found out that the kid was drinking alcohol at school x

marialuisa-pr:

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

bolding mine

(via moniquill)

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

tybaltcapulets:

stormhornets:

pilgrim—soul:

youcantcancelquidditch:

gUYS VOYAGER 1 IS CONFIRMED OUT OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM WE’VE BROKEN OUT OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM THIS IS REALLY COOL

OH MY GOSH REALLY THIS IS SO COOL AUGH HUMANITY

Plus, there’s this incredibly scary but really fucking cool clip of what interstellar space sounds like

WHY AREN’T MORE PEOPLE EXCITED ABOUT THIS????

(via moniquill)

lifeislikeabadrpg:

ayothewuisback:

White peoples’ definition of racism is hurt feelings, instead of what it actually is, and that’s systematic destruction of an ethnic group. Understand that, and then you’ll understand why racism doesn’t “go both ways”.

This.

(via moniquill)